Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Organization And Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

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Organization And Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2016
Organization And Summary Of Significant Accounting Policies Policies  
Interim Financial Statements

Interim Financial Statements

 

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited. These unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”) and applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) regarding interim financial reporting. Certain information and note disclosures normally included in the financial statements prepared in accordance with GAAP have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. Accordingly, these interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015 filed with the SEC. The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2015 included herein was derived from the audited consolidated financial statements as of that date, but does not include all disclosures, including notes, required by GAAP.

 

In the opinion of management, the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments necessary to fairly present the Company's financial position and results of operations for the interim periods reflected. Except as noted, all adjustments contained herein are of a normal recurring nature. Results of operations for the fiscal periods presented herein are not necessarily indicative of fiscal year-end results.

Organization

Organization

 

The Company was incorporated as Conceptualistics, Inc. on January 6, 1988 in Delaware. Subsequent to its incorporation, the Company changed its name to Eat at Joe’s, Ltd. In February 2015, the Company changed its name to SPYR, Inc. and adopted a new ticker symbol “SPYR” effective March 12, 2015.

Nature of Business

Nature of Business

 

The primary focus of SPYR, Inc. (the “Company”) is to act as a holding company and develop a portfolio of profitable subsidiaries, not limited by any particular industry or business.

 

We currently own three operating subsidiaries, two in the digital technology industry and, one in the restaurant industry, each having their own particular focus.

 

Through our wholly owned subsidiaries, SPYR APPS, LLC and SPYR APPS Oy, we operate our mobile games and applications business. The focus of the SPYR APPS subsidiaries is the development and publication of our own mobile games as well as the publication of games developed by third-party developers.

 

Through our other wholly owned subsidiary, E.A.J.: PHL Airport, Inc., we own and operate the restaurant “Eat at Joe’s” ®, which is located in the Philadelphia International Airport and has been in operations since 1997.

Principles of Consolidation

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of SPYR, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, SPYR APPS, LLC, a Nevada Limited Liability Company, and SPYR APPS, Oy, a Finnish Limited Liability Company, and E.A.J.: PHL, Airport Inc., a Pennsylvania corporation. Intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company generates revenues from its wholly owned subsidiaries, which operate separate and distinct businesses. The following is a summary of our revenue recognition policies.

 

Through our wholly owned subsidiary SPYR APPS, LLC, we develop, publish and co-publish mobile games, and then generate revenue through those games by way of advertising and in-app purchases. The Company recognizes revenue using four basic criteria that must be met before revenue can be recognized: (1) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; (2) delivery has occurred; (3) the selling price is fixed and determinable; and (4) collectability is reasonably assured, which is typically after receipt of payment and delivery.

 

Though our wholly owned subsidiary E.A.J.: PHL, Airport, Inc. we generate revenue from the sale of food and beverage products through our restaurant. Revenue from the restaurant is recognized upon sale to a customer and receipt of payment.

Income Taxes

Income Taxes

 

The Company accounts for income taxes under the provisions of ASC 740 “Accounting for Income Taxes,” which requires a company to first determine whether it is more likely than not (which is defined as a likelihood of more than fifty percent) that a tax position will be sustained based on its technical merits as of the reporting date, assuming that taxing authorities will examine the position and have full knowledge of all relevant information. A tax position that meets this more likely than not threshold is then measured and recognized at the largest amount of benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely to be realized upon effective settlement with a taxing authority.

 

Deferred income taxes are recognized for the tax consequences related to temporary differences between the carrying amount of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for tax purposes at each year end, based on enacted tax laws and statutory tax rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. A valuation allowance is recognized when, based on the weight of all available evidence, it is considered more likely than not that all, or some portion, of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. The Company evaluates its valuation allowance requirements based on projected future operations. When circumstances change and cause a change in management's judgment about the recoverability of deferred tax assets, the impact of the change on the valuation is reflected in current income. Income tax expense is the sum of current income tax plus the change in deferred tax assets and liabilities.

Use of Estimates

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Estimates and assumptions used by management affected impairment analysis for fixed assets, intangible assets, amounts of potential liabilities and valuation of issuance of equity securities. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Earnings (Loss) Per Share

Earnings (Loss) Per Share

 

The Company’s computation of earnings (loss) per share (EPS) includes basic and diluted EPS. Basic EPS is calculated by dividing the Company’s net income (loss) available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares during the period. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution, using the treasury stock method that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that then shared in the net income (loss) of the Company. In computing diluted EPS, the treasury stock method assumes that outstanding options and warrants are exercised and the proceeds are used to purchase common stock at the average market price during the period. Shares of restricted stock are included in the basic weighted average number of common shares outstanding from the time they vest.

 

The basic and fully diluted shares for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2016 are the same because the inclusion of the potential shares (Non-vested Common – 83,333, Class A – 26,909,028, Class E – 163,415, Options – 11,250,000) would have had an anti-dilutive effect due to the Company generating a loss for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2016.

 

The basic and fully diluted shares for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015 are the same because the inclusion of the potential shares (Non-vested Common – 416,666, Class A – 26,909,028, Class E – 436,681, Warrants – 250,000) would have had an anti-dilutive effect due to the Company generating a loss for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2015.

Stock-Based Compensation

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company periodically issues stock options and warrants to employees and non-employees in non-capital raising transactions for services and for financing costs. The Company accounts for stock option and warrant grants issued and vesting to employees based on the authoritative guidance provided by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) whereas the value of the award is measured on the date of grant and recognized over the vesting period. The Company accounts for stock option and warrant grants issued and vesting to non-employees in accordance with the authoritative guidance of the FASB whereas the value of the stock compensation is based upon the measurement date as determined at either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete. Non-employee stock-based compensation charges generally are amortized over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. In certain circumstances where there are no future performance requirements by the non-employee, option grants are immediately vested and the total stock-based compensation charge is recorded in the period of the measurement date.

 

The fair value of the Company's stock option and warrant grants is estimated using the Black-Scholes Option Pricing model, which uses certain assumptions related to risk-free interest rates, expected volatility, expected life of the stock options or warrants, and future dividends. Compensation expense is recorded based upon the value derived from the Black-Scholes Option Pricing model, and based on actual experience. The assumptions used in the Black-Scholes Option Pricing model could materially affect compensation expense recorded in future periods.

 

The Company also issues restricted shares of its common stock for share-based compensation programs to employees and non-employees. The Company measures the compensation cost with respect to restricted shares to employees based upon the estimated fair value at the date of the grant, and is recognized as expense over the period which an employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award. For non-employees, the Company measures the compensation cost with respect to restricted shares based upon the estimated fair value at measurement date which is either a) the date at which a performance commitment is reached, or b) at the date at which the necessary performance to earn the equity instruments is complete.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company follows paragraph 825-10-50-10 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification for disclosures about fair value of its financial instruments and paragraph 820-10-35-37 of the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (“Paragraph 820-10-35-37”) to measure the fair value of its financial instruments. Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (U.S. GAAP), and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. To increase consistency and comparability in fair value measurements and related disclosures, Paragraph 820-10-35-37 establishes a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three (3) broad levels. The fair value hierarchy gives the highest priority to quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs.

 

The three (3) levels of fair value hierarchy defined by Paragraph 820-10-35-37 are described below:

 

Level 1: Quoted market prices available in active markets for identical assets or liabilities as of the reporting date.

 

Level 2: Pricing inputs other than quoted prices in active markets included in Level 1, which are either directly or indirectly observable as of the reporting date.

 

Level 3: Pricing inputs that are generally observable inputs and not corroborated by market data.

 

The carrying amount of the Company’s financial assets and liabilities, such as cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, inventory, prepaid expenses, and accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate their fair value because of the short maturity of those instruments.

 

The Company’s trading securities are measured at fair value using level 1 fair values.

Software Licensing Costs

Software Licensing Costs

 

Software licensing publishing costs pertain to non-refundable payments made to independent gaming software developers pursuant to licensing agreements. The payments are intended to assist gaming software developers in the marketing and further development of two gaming software applications.

 

Software licensing costs were $760,000 for the nine months ended September 30, 2016 and was reflected as part of Other General and Administrative Expenses on the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. There were no such costs in 2015.

Capitalized Licensing Rights

Capitalized Licensing Rights

 

Capitalized licensing rights represent fees paid to intellectual property rights holders for use of their trademarks, copyrights, software, technology, music or other intellectual property or proprietary rights in the development of our products. Depending upon the agreement with the rights holder, we may obtain the right to use the intellectual property in multiple products over a number of years, or alternatively, for a single product.

 

Significant management judgments and estimates are utilized in assessing the recoverability of capitalized costs. In evaluating the recoverability of capitalized costs, the assessment of expected product performance utilizes forecasted sales amounts and estimates of additional costs to be incurred. If revised forecasted or actual product sales are less than the originally forecasted amounts utilized in the initial recoverability analysis, the net realizable value may be lower than originally estimated in any given quarter, which could result in an impairment charge. Material differences may result in the amount and timing of expenses for any period if management makes different judgments or utilizes different estimates in evaluating these qualitative factors.

 

As of December 31, 2015, the Company capitalized $80,000 as a result of the acquisition of licensing rights for two gaming applications.

 

During the nine months ended September 30, 2016, the Company capitalized an additional $210,000 and amortized $22,500. As of September 30, 2016, the unamortized capitalized licensing rights amounted to $267,500. The Company estimates that the two gaming applications will have an estimated life ranging from two to five years, which approximates the term of the respective licenses.

Recent Accounting Standards

Recent Accounting Standards

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. ASU 2014-09 is a comprehensive revenue recognition standard that will supersede nearly all existing revenue recognition guidance under current U.S. GAAP and replace it with a principle based approach for determining revenue recognition. ASU 2014-09 will require that companies recognize revenue based on the value of transferred goods or services as they occur in the contract. The ASU also will require additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts, including significant judgments and changes in judgments and assets recognized from costs incurred to obtain or fulfill a contract. ASU 2014-09 is effective for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted only in annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods therein. Entities will be able to transition to the standard either retrospectively or as a cumulative-effect adjustment as of the date of adoption. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of ASU 2014-09 on the Company’s financial statements and disclosures.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2016-02, Leases. ASU 2016-02 requires a lessee to record a right of use asset and a corresponding lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases with terms longer than 12 months. ASU 2016-02 is effective for all interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018. Early adoption is permitted. A modified retrospective transition approach is required for lessees for capital and operating leases existing at, or entered into after, the beginning of the earliest comparative period presented in the financial statements, with certain practical expedients available. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of ASU 2016-02 on the Company’s financial statements and disclosures.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued the ASU 2016-09, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. The amendments in this ASU require, among other things, that all income tax effects of awards be recognized in the income statement when the awards vest or are settled. The ASU also allows for an employer to repurchase more of an employee's shares than it can today for tax withholding purposes without triggering liability accounting and allows for a policy election to account for forfeitures as they occur. The amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted for any entity in any interim or annual period. The Company is currently evaluating the expected impact that the standard could have on its financial statements and related disclosures.

 

Other recent accounting pronouncements issued by the FASB, including its Emerging Issues Task Force, the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, and the Securities and Exchange Commission did not or are not believed by management to have a material impact on the Company's present or future consolidated financial statements.